58) The Royal Belgian Geographical Society in their “Expedition Antarctique Belge,” recorded that during the most severe part of the Antarctic winter, from 71 degrees South latitude onwards, the sun sets on May 17th and is not seen above the horizon again until July 21st! This is completely at odds with the ball-Earth theory, but easily explained by the flat-Earth model. The Midnight Sun is seen from high altitudes in extreme Northern latitudes during Arctic summer because the Sun, at its inner-most cycle, is circling tightly enough around the polar center that it remains visible above the horizon for someone at such a vantage point. Likewise, in extreme Southern latitudes during Arctic summer, the Sun completely disappears from view for over 2 months because there at the Northern Tropic, at the inner-most arc of its boomerang journey, the Sun is circling the Northern center too tightly to be seen from the Southern circumference.
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The flat earth movement began in the 19th century with the publications of Samuel Rowbotham. In the summer of 1838, Rowbotham conducted his Bedford level experiment. The Bedford level is a six-mile stretch of water that is very straight and level. Over the six miles, the earth ought to curve downward by 24 feet. Rowbotham stationed himself at one end of the Bedford level, and arranged for someone else in a small boat to row to the other end. A five-foot mast was attached to the boat, so certainly by the end of the level the mast would not be visible, because the top of the mast would have been 11 feet below Rowbotham’s line of sight. Rowbotham observed the boat with a telescope mounted eight inches above the water. Rowbotham could see the small boat over the entire course of the Bedford level, whereupon he became convinced that the earth was flat. I’ve previously discussed the Bedford level experiment, in which I explained that atmospheric refraction bent the light of the boat along the surface of the earth, making the boat visible, even though the boat actually was below the direct line of sight. Here I wish to expand upon the phenomenon that caused Rowbotham’s experiment to go awry.
Astronomers tell us that, in consequence of the Earth's "rotundity," the perpendicular walls of buildings are, nowhere, parallel, and that even the walls of houses on opposite sides of a street are not! But, since all observation fails to find any evidence of this want of parallelism which theory demands, the idea must be renounced as being absurd and in opposition to all well-known facts. This is a proof that the Earth is not a globe.

If the sun was 93 million miles away the light would fade evenly on the horizon. This is depicted in NASA's animation of the ISS watching s sunset. In reality, however, this is NOT what we see. Instead of a distant sun creating an evenly fading sunset, we see a small light source illuminating locally and taking its light with it as it moves away from our side of flat earth.


The most commonly accepted explanation of this is that the space agencies of the world are involved in a conspiracy faking space travel and exploration. This likely began during the Cold War's 'Space Race', in which the USSR and USA were obsessed with beating each other into space to the point that each faked their accomplishments in an attempt to keep pace with the other's supposed achievements. Since the end of the Cold War, however, the conspiracy is most likely motivated by greed rather than political gains, and using only some of their funding to continue to fake space travel saves a lot of money to embezzle for themselves.
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